Systemtheorie - Methoden und Anwendungen für ein- und mehrdimensionale Systeme (German Edition)

Audaz, productivo y feliz constituye una valiosa guía para alcanzar la Éxito. Una guía extraordinaria (Autoayuda Y Superación) (Spanish Edition) El líder que no tenía cargo: Una fábula moderna sobre el liderazgo en la o Conseguir un rendimiento extraordinario en tu trabajo y en tu vida. . 1-Stunden-Lieferung.

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online To Love and Be Wise file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with To Love and Be Wise book. Happy reading To Love and Be Wise Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF To Love and Be Wise at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF To Love and Be Wise Pocket Guide.

There is no body, though they have dragged the river repeatedly. Searle had definitely argued with several in town, including Walter. Could he have been murdered? The Clock Strikes Twelve. Miss Silver Comes to Stay. The Case is Closed. Anna, Where Are You?

Reward Yourself

The Girl in the Cellar. The Estate of the Beckoning Lady. Murder At High Oak. The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club. Murder by the Barrel. Menace at the Christmas Market. The Mystery at Underwood House. Closer to Death in a Garden. Death of a Ghost. Delayed Death Temptation in Florence 1. A Treasury of Sayers Stories. Never Murder a Birder.

Murder on the Oceanic. Murder on the Celtic.


  1. TO LOVE AND.
  2. Childrens Literature in Context (Texts and Contexts)!
  3. Stupid Laws of Venezuela: Funny, Dumb and Strange Venezuelan Laws.

A View To Murder. The Mistletoe Murder and Other Stories. Knock, Knock, You're Dead! The Widows of Malabar Hill. No Shred of Evidence. Marriage Can Be Murder. Death in a Cold Spring. You Never Can Tell. Blood on the Bones. The Daughter Of Time. The Man In The Queue. The Complete Inspector Grant Mysteries. To Love And Be Wise. The solution is highly ingenious, albeit impossible in real life, view spoiler [ a subterfuge couldn't be maintained because humans excrete hide spoiler ] but that's almost the least part of the joy of a novel that's deliciously written and intent more on characterization and exploring the nature of love.

Inspector Alan I was a tad disappointed by the last Tey novel I re read, The Singing Sands , so approached this one, which I hadn't read before, with a little caution. Inspector Alan Grant Tey's series hero meets American photographer Leslie Searle at the launch party for the new novel by romance writer Lavinia Fitch, and is startled by the man's beauty; he's one of those rare people whom others simply cannot help looking at. Grant's at the party merely to give his actress friend Marta Hallard a good excuse to slip off early; Leslie's there to introduce himself to the author, whose nephew, nationally loved nature broadcaster and in private sad sack Walter Whitmore, was a mutual friend of a now-deceased war photographer.

No sooner does Leslie tell her this than she invites him to come stay with the family at their home in Salcott St. Marta, over dinner with Grant, predicts trouble. A while back Walter was engaged to actress Marguerite Merriam, widely regarded as a national treasure although in private like Walter himself someone less admirable. When Walter discovered her true nature he broke off the engagement and Marguerite, a trouper to the last, committed suicide.

To Love and Be Wise: Josephine Tey: cutyrasohase.tk: Books

Now Walter is engaged to his plain but intriguing stepsister Liz, whose stepmother mother Emma is determined the marriage will go through. There's a double "step" involved, so there's no blood relationship between Walter and Liz. Marta reckons that Emma will take one look at the beautiful Leslie and realize how likely it is that he might steal Liz's heart. And for a while that looks as if it might happen. Liz and Leslie become fast friends and spend much of their time together, to the smoldering resentment of Walter and his mother.

Current Reading

The locals, who generally detest the artsy new arrivals, get on just fine with Leslie, although he has a habit of puncturing the egos, and thereby earning the enmity, of the other glitterati. Walter and Leslie decide to collaborate on a book, Walter doing the words and Leslie the pictures. They'll travel down the nearby river in canoes, camping each night and recording the landscapes and bits of nature they see.

At first this goes well, but one night, after a rather overt disagreement in the pub near their riverside campsite, Leslie disappears as if plucked from the face of the earth. The suspicion is that he was murdered, by drowning or otherwise, and his body consigned to the river, which is notorious for its reluctance to yield up its captives.

Walter's the prime suspect, the supposed motive being jealousy over Liz. Yet everyone who knows him pooh-poohs the notion: Walter's far too vapid to kill anyone. Grant re-enters the tale as the Scotland Yard detective entrusted with the case, but essentially his investigations get nowhere. He agrees that Walter's an improbable suspect. Emma's a possibility, but again he's unpersuaded. And, although the river eventually spills up one of Leslie's shoes, there's no trace of a body.

He goes back to London, where he and his boss decide that the most probable cause of the disappearance is misadventure. This is very, very far from a standard mystery; also, although it plays with the trappings of the "village cozy," its ambience could hardly be more removed.

Join Kobo & start eReading today

The observations of the various characters involved are penetrating, compassionate and occasionally laugh-out-loud hilarious. There are also a couple of startlingly lewd concealed jokes for the alert reader to find. Some of the peripheral characters -- a few of the artsy types -- are deliberately stereotyped for purposes of parody, but mostly you feel these are real people.

The result is a true page-turner, with the bonus that there's a genuinely puzzling mystery to be solved. I read later into the night than I intended. View all 4 comments. Inspector Grant is a Scotland Yard inspector who has been assigned to investigate a disappearance of an American. It turns out that Grant had previously met this American when he was attending a party with his actress acquaintance, Marta Hallard. Searle is asked to spend a weekend with the at the families estate. After a time there, Searle disappears, is presumed possibly to have drowned or been murdered and Grant is assigned to investigate.

The rest of the story is taken up with Grant's investigation. It's quite a gentle story but it is thoughtful and well-written and keeps you engrossed. Grant is a likeable, appealing character to carry the story. His investigation is tidy and intuitive and the people with whom he interacts are also quirky and interesting.

Bertrand Russell - Love Is Wise

I especially liked his Sgt, Williams, as he is a nice foil for Grant and he admires Grant very much. I also liked Grant's 'girlfriend', actress Marta Hallard; lovely, intelligent, sensible and someone who Grant is able to bounce his thoughts off. All in all, I enjoyed this story more than I thought I would. It was well-crafted, thoughtful and ended satisfyingly. Jan 22, Donna rated it really liked it Shelves: A delightful mystery story with Alan Grant as the debonair detective. Grant does police work because he likes it. A relative has left him a legacy on which he could retire, but he keeps at his job and is good at it.

In this story a young photographer goes missing in the night. I'm proud that I detected the key to the mystery, even if I didn't get it completely correct. I especially like the part where two policemen recite poetry to each other and then bur A delightful mystery story with Alan Grant as the debonair detective.

I especially like the part where two policemen recite poetry to each other and then burst out laughing at whether those crazy detective story novelists would ever think of policemen reciting poetry. Apr 06, Anmiryam rated it it was amazing. I went into this looking for a light read to suit my mood and came to discover that this classic mystery is still strikingly modern in its central issues of identity and gender.

It has set my brain ticking on how these issues crop up in other of Tey's novels. Why has no one has written a serious work of criticism about these novels? Val McDermid wrote an excellent piece several years ago that you can find here: More context, more interpretatio I went into this looking for a light read to suit my mood and came to discover that this classic mystery is still strikingly modern in its central issues of identity and gender.

More context, more interpretation, more analysis of themes that appear and reappear in these all too brief and wonderfully twisty books. Nov 06, Elisabeth rated it really liked it Shelves: This is one of the slightly odder plots among Tey's mysteries—but, oh, how I do like Inspector Grant. He and Sergeant Williams are getting to be one of my favorite detective duos in fiction. Grant is the observant connoisseur of human nature that's usually found among the amateur detectives, the sidekicks and the chroniclers, yet he's also a highly professional and efficient police inspector, which makes for a fascinating combination.

Tey's writing is wonderful too, and her plots alwa 3. Tey's writing is wonderful too, and her plots always have plenty of twists and tantalizing clues. It was a wonderful surprise to read this. The characters were all well-drawn, the plot fluid and engaging, and the ending was quite unexpected. There was also none of the stifling class rigidities that usually plagued such works. I find Agatha Christie and her ilk quite unreadable now, and on It was a wonderful surprise to read this. I find Agatha Christie and her ilk quite unreadable now, and one of the main differences is that Josephine Tey is a much more accomplished writer.

View all 3 comments. Full of eccentrics, a chap who dancers, famous names, life in the country estates, and a disdain for everyone from the US. As with other novels in this series, the characters are from the theatre and there is an American link. In this case a famous American photographer goes missing. Murder, kidnapping, an accident or a practical joke? And the denouement must have created waves at the time with the introduction of transvestism.

Sep 22, Laura rated it really liked it Shelves: Jun 26, Rage rated it really liked it Shelves: I solved the puzzle before the end of the book!!!! I rarely know what's going on before it's revealed by the detective, so that was quite a coup for me. Of course, lots of little hints are dropped throughout the narrative. I've never encountered this in real life, but I do know a few trans folks and drag queens - who don't really commit a lot of crime I solved the puzzle before the end of the book!!!!

I've never encountered this in real life, but I do know a few trans folks and drag queens - who don't really commit a lot of crime, much less plot murders or embezzlement, etc. Although one time I did hear about someone running out of a store with a wig. Chief Inspector Alan Grant meets American photographer Leslie Searle at a party, and a few weeks later finds himself investigating the man's disappearance in highly suspicious circumstances. I thought I'd read all of Josephine Tey's few books so this one came as a surprise.

I haven't always enjoyed them, but I think this was one of her best. It's not quite so full of impossible coi Chief Inspector Alan Grant meets American photographer Leslie Searle at a party, and a few weeks later finds himself investigating the man's disappearance in highly suspicious circumstances. It's not quite so full of impossible coincidences as some, and the main characters are well drawn. This is the first one I've read by this author. I look forward to reading more. I appreciated her very wry sense of humor. Oct 12, Jo rated it really liked it.

I love Josephine Tey, and can't believe I hadn't read this book before. Aug 14, JZ rated it it was amazing Shelves: What an amazingly pleasant surprise, from the first chapter to the last. I think this is my favorite Inspector Grant episode, so far. Feb 17, Jean Cole rated it really liked it Shelves: I am a relative newcomer to the works of Ms. I have since learned that Josephine Tey was the pen name of one Elizabeth Mackintosh who was born in Inverness in She was a very private person, never granting interviews and shunning publicity which no doubt accounts for why she doesn't have the notoriety of, say, Agatha Christie.

All the elements of the traditional English Country House murder are present, spiced up by the presence of movie stars, artist colonies, and the attendant emotional frailties and jealousies that are present whenever artistes are gathered together. In a perfect world I would have settled in next to a crackling fire with a glass of red wine and a plate of shortbread cookies and devoured Alan Grant 4 at one sitting.

In real life, I'll look forward to the next installment. Tired of mysteries where the bodies keep piling up? Agatha Christie believed that when a mystery gets boring, the solution is to bring on another body. Josephine Tey felt confident that the fans of her quirky, character-driven novels would be content with NO body if the story line was good.

This is one of her later books it was published two years before her death and I think one of her best. The scene is the small village of Salcott St. Mary, where best-selling romance novelist La Tired of mysteries where the bodies keep piling up? Mary, where best-selling romance novelist Lavinia Fitch has settled into a huge garish mansion called Trimmings.

Her household consists of her stern older sister, the sister's grown stepdaughter who serves as Lavinia's secretary and her pompous windbag of a nephew, who's a popular radio broadcaster. The nephew has recently escaped an entanglement with a neurotic actress and seems content to settle down and marry his aunt's stepdaughter. Leslie Searle is a well-known Hollywood photographer who wants to do a book on the English countryside. It's soon decided that he will supply the pictures and Nephew will write the text. The problem is that Searle is a strangely unsettling creature with some indefinable quality that causes everyone around him to behave oddly.

And then he disappears. When Inspector Alan Grant is called into the case, he finds a village that has been "discovered" i. Tey is at her brilliant best describing the vanity and silliness of this bizarre bunch, which includes a egotistical playwright, a volatile "Russian" ballet dancer, a morose novelist, and Grant's old friend, actress Marta Hallard. Instead of figuring out whodunit, the good Inspector must decide what exactly WAS done. It's a delightful book with a surprise ending. At least, it surprised me. It's one of my all-time favorites.

It's oddly named, but a real deal for a lover of classic British mysteries. Apr 22, Lisa Harmonybites rated it really liked it Recommends it for: I've recently been rereading the Josephine Tey mysteries. Sadly, there aren't many--only eight of them. One of the pleasures of reading To Love and Be Wise after almost all of the others was recognizing allusions to the prior novels, such as Jerry Lamont, a suspect in The Man in the Queue ; Jammy Hopkins, the sensationalist journalist from A Shilling for Candles ; and several characters that would get a mention in The Daughter of Time such as Benny Skoll, and novelists Lavinia Fitch and Silas Week I've recently been rereading the Josephine Tey mysteries.

One of the pleasures of reading To Love and Be Wise after almost all of the others was recognizing allusions to the prior novels, such as Jerry Lamont, a suspect in The Man in the Queue ; Jammy Hopkins, the sensationalist journalist from A Shilling for Candles ; and several characters that would get a mention in The Daughter of Time such as Benny Skoll, and novelists Lavinia Fitch and Silas Weekly.

Lavinia Fitch actually has a prominent role in this novel, as she plays hostess to American photographer Leslie Searle. Inspector Alan Grant meets the "beautiful young man" briefly at a party. Weeks later he'll be investigating Searle's disappearance and possible murder. Lavinia says of Searle she's "sure that he was something very wicked in Ancient Greece" and her guest has an unsettling effect on all around him. Her Inspector Alan Grant has rather grown on me through the novels. He's no Sherlock Holmes or Hercule Poirot.

He's not at all flashy or eccentric and his strong suit isn't brilliant deductions, but what his superior calls "flair. He's about the most fallible detective protagonist I've ever read. I love Tey's style--spare, lyrical and witty and her characters are delightfully individualized. Even though I don't think this is one of her best novels, it may be her best mystery.

Tey tends not to care much about devising perfect little puzzle pieces. She certainly plays fair this time--the clues are all there, even if very quietly dropped in, and I do remember the twist as a surprise first time reading, which makes for a delicious denouement. Josephine Tey continues to be about the only "Golden Age" mystery writer that I care for although I have begun making inroads on Dorothy L. Sayers , and To Love and Be Wise continues my admiration of her writing. The cast of characters sparkles. The celebrities are all eccentric in their own little ways.

Some of them make you laugh, some of them make you shake your head, and some just make you want to slap them. The excellent working relationship of Grant and the trusty Detective Sergeant Willi Josephine Tey continues to be about the only "Golden Age" mystery writer that I care for although I have begun making inroads on Dorothy L. The excellent working relationship of Grant and the trusty Detective Sergeant Williams is further explained. And that disappearance of Leslie Searle is truly puzzling-- although Tey plants a vital clue to its solution at the very beginning of the story.

More than anything else-- especially with Williams being pulled away to conclude a case in London-- the pace is slow and deliberate, as though Grant is taking a leisurely stroll through the suspect pool and trying the noose on each of them for size. And as he's sizing them up, the reader is allowed to do much the same.

I found To Love and Be Wise quite refreshing. No electronics to fuss with.

To Love and Be Wise (1950) by Josephine Tey

No serial killers to be in fear of. Just a very real puzzle: At the rate I'm going, I may actually become a fan of these classic mysteries!


  • To Love and be Wise - Josephine Tey - Random Jottings.
  • Criminal T04 : Putain de nuit ! (French Edition);
  • The Passing Tramp: To Love and Be Wise (), by Josephine Tey.
  • Jan 23, Donna Robbins rated it really liked it Recommends it for: This is the 3rd or 4th Inspector Alan Grant novel depending on whether you count The Franchise Affair and it's surprising how dissimilar the plots are. I've been reading them in order, and her plotting and characterization seem to get better and better, while Tey's terrific prose and wit has made reading all of them a pleasure.

    This book is dryly funny and thoughtful, and reveals more of Tey's insight into human nature; and as a bonus, it seemed to include a bit less of the prejudices classis This is the 3rd or 4th Inspector Alan Grant novel depending on whether you count The Franchise Affair and it's surprising how dissimilar the plots are. This book is dryly funny and thoughtful, and reveals more of Tey's insight into human nature; and as a bonus, it seemed to include a bit less of the prejudices classism, homophobia, antisemitism that I found jarring in the earlier stories.

    The mystery unfolds slowly and is as much an excuse to explore the characters and their relationships as it is a murder investigation; I loved the uneasy mood created by the characters' reactions to Leslie Searle. The entire cast of characters was interesting, consisting mainly of artistic types; Tey skewered most of them, especially the writers, making me wonder if she didn't particularly like authors. Or, maybe she just had a low tolerance for what she saw as formulaic writing and pompous posturing. To Love and Be Wise 1 6 Apr 05, Josephine Tey was a pseudonym of Elizabeth Mackintosh.

    Josephine was her mother's first name and Tey the surname of an English Grandmother. The first of these, 'The Man in the Queue' was published under the pseudonym of Gordon Daviot , whose name also appears on the title page of another of her 19 Josephine Tey was a pseudonym of Elizabeth Mackintosh. The first of these, 'The Man in the Queue' was published under the pseudonym of Gordon Daviot , whose name also appears on the title page of another of her novels, 'Kit An Unvarnished History'.

    She also used the Daviot by-line for a biography of the 17th century cavalry leader John Graham, which was entitled 'Claverhouse' Mackintosh also wrote plays both one act and full length , some of which were produced during her lifetime, under the pseudonym Gordon Daviot. The district of Daviot, near her home of Inverness in Scotland, was a location her family had vacationed. The name Gordon does not appear in either her family or her history.

    Upon graduation, she became a physical training instructor for eight years. In , her mother died and she returned home to Inverness to care for her invalid father. Busy with household duties, she turned to writing as a diversion, and was successful in creating a second career.

    Search This Blog

    Alfred Hitchcock filmed one of her novels, 'A Shilling for Candles' as 'Young and Innocent' in and two other of her novels have been made into films, 'The Franchise Affair' , filmed in , and 'Brat Farrar' , filmed as 'Paranoiac' in In addition a number of her works have been dramatised for radio. Her novel 'The Daughter of Time' was voted the greatest mystery novel of all time by the Crime Writers' Association in Miss Mackintosh never married, and died at the age of 55, in London.